The Generosity of Birders

I ran into John Haas and Scotty Baldinger out at the Basha Kill this morning. They were on the trail of a suspected King Rail, which turned out to be this very accommodating Virginia Rail. I'm sure John and Scotty were disappointed but I sure wasn't - it was a life bird for both myself and Joyce D. who had joined us along with Mary B. in the search.
I ran into John Haas and Scotty Baldinger out at the Basha Kill this morning. I joined them in search of  a suspected King Rail. We were joined shortly after by fellow Mearns Bird Club members Joyce D and Mary B. The King Rail turned out to be this very accommodating Virginia Rail. I’m sure John and Scotty were disappointed but I sure wasn’t – it was a life bird for both myself and Joyce D.
Here's one more of the Virginia Rail, Basha Kill 6/22/13.
Here’s one more of the Virginia Rail, Basha Kill 6/22/13.

This post includes three birds that I enjoyed watching an photographing this week. They are also birds that I would not have been nearly as likely to find without the generosity of my fellow birders. I have wanted to write a post about this for a while now, when I think back on all the posts I have made over the last year or so, how often am I thanking another birder? Very often! I am continually impressed by how kind and giving birders are; my experiences with other birders here in Orange County and the surrounding areas have been overwhelmingly positive. I have yet to come across a birder that is secretive or keeping any sort of “birding hotspot” to themselves. Rather, it is much more common to run into other birders out in the field, where they will give me the most detailed directions to get a good look or photograph of the latest bird that I am seeking.

Additionally, birders will  take the time and energy to share their observations by texting, emailing or posting online. Again, this usually includes accurate and very detailed descriptions of where and when the bird had been seen.

The birding community is an extremely nice group of people, one that I feel I have slowly become a part of over the past couple of years. I want to take this opportunity to thank all the generous birders out there – I hope I can repay you all at one time or another.

Karen Miller and I ran into Curt McDermott out at Stewart Forest on Wednesday evening. On Thursday evening I was taking photos of Bank Swallow in Wallkill thanks to a hot tip and perfect directions from Curt.
Karen Miller and I ran into Curt McDermott out at Stewart Forest on Wednesday evening. On Thursday evening I was taking photos of Bank Swallows in Wallkill thanks to a hot tip and perfect directions from Curt. Btw, this is a difficult bird to photograph. I realize this is not a great photo but it was the best I could do! I plan give it another go sometime soon…
Ken McDermott and Ajit both posted on the Mearns Bird Club that there were Purple Martins out at the Shawangunk Grasslands. I got out there this morning and managed to get some flight photos.
Earlier this week, I received an email from Ken McDermott and Ajit Antony posted on the Mearns Bird Club that there were Purple Martins out at the Shawangunk Grasslands. I got out there this morning and managed to get some flight photos.

 

2 thoughts on “The Generosity of Birders”

  1. Matt,
    Seasoned birders are always happy to have new , enthusiastic birders join the ranks of the local birding community. When a bird is shared, it brings it to light as when you got to see it the first time. As a birders list grows the special moments decrease, so its always nice to see someone get it for the first time. This morning with you, Scott, Joyce and Mary was one of those times. The other great thing about new birders is they eventually share their great finds with those who they’ve birded with, so its a bonus for all. Congrats on the lifer and nice to see you today, John

    1. I can certainly appreciate what you are saying John. Although I am by no means a seasoned birder, I have had the same opportunity with beginners and people who are not birders at all. This happens all the time for me down at the Nature Watch at the Basha Kill main boat launch. What a joy to see someone look into the scope and get a really good look at a wild eagle, possibly for the first time! I think what really impresses me is how often this happens in birding; it really indicates (to me) that birders are good people.

      Great to see you, and thanks again for the help getting the Virginia Rail – what a thrill!

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